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2 edition of Tax-benefit models for developing countries found in the catalog.

Tax-benefit models for developing countries

A. B. Atkinson

Tax-benefit models for developing countries

lessons from developed countries

by A. B. Atkinson

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Published by Taxation, Incentives and the Distribution of Income Programme, Suntory-Toyota International Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementA.B. Atkinsonand F. Bourguignon.
SeriesDiscussion paper -- no.TIDI/145
ContributionsBourguignon, Franc ʹois., Taxation, Incentives and the Distribution of Income Programme.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13941656M

First, revenue mobilization in developing countries typically relies more heavily on corporate income taxes (CIT) than it does in advanced countries (Figure )—and a relatively large part of these CIT revenues in developing countries often comes from multinationals. Second, international spillovers from global corporate tax practices are. that developing countries face many generic and specific obstacles in implementing tax systems that can meet their unique needs and that will also finance the necessary level of public spending in the most efficient way.6 Developing countries would like to increase 2 Richard M. Bird, Tax Policy and Economic Development (Baltimore: John Hopkins.

Developing and Using Dynamic Microsimulation Models for Public Policy Analysis LIAM Book - Methodology Methodological aspects of dynamic microsimulation models The life-cycle income analysis model Tax-Benefit Systems of EU countries. Different definitions. The term used for this concept varies depending on country. In the United States, where government benefit payments are colloquially referred to as "welfare", the welfare trap often indicates that a person is completely dependent on benefits, with little or no hope of self-sufficiency. The welfare trap is also known as the unemployment trap or the poverty trap, .

This chapter aims to help clarify some of the problems and issues raised by attempts to understand and alleviate the deprivation and fragility associated with the lives of so many people. It explains what social security means and defines the term with respect to objectives for developing countries. The chapter determines why the State should be involved in social Author: Robin Burgess. The sizeable increase in income inequality experienced in advanced economies and many parts of the world since the s and the severe consequences of the global economic and financial crisis have brought distributional issues to the top of the policy agenda. The challenge for many governments is to address concerns over rising inequality while simultaneously promoting .


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Tax-benefit models for developing countries by A. B. Atkinson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Corrections. All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:del:abcdefSee general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions Tax-benefit models for developing countries book this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract. D ECOSTER, P IRTTILÄ, S UTHERLAND, W RIGHT SOUTHMOD: Modelling Tax-benefit Systems in Developing Countries indirect tax analysis into the models.

The SOUTHMOD models for Ethiopia, Tanzania. More recently, a group of countries (Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Venezuela) have developed tax benefit models following the EUROMOD modelling conventions.

The specific objectives of this request for research proposals are to: 1 Understand better the role of tax-benefit policy in developing countries regarding poverty reduction and inequality. 2 Contribute to a better understanding of modelling behavioural effects within tax-benefit microsimulation models to inform the policy debate.

3 Push the. Tax−Benefit Models for Developing Countries: Lessons from Developed Countries Anthony B. Atkinson and Francois Bourguignon link Tax−Benefit Models in Industrial Countries link The Relevance of Tax−benefit Models in Developing Countries link Conclusion link Notes link References link Part VII.

Tax Policy and Economic Growth File Size: 1MB. The OECD Tax-Benefit Model 1. The architecture of the Model The OECD Tax-Benefit model covers 40 countries (33 OECD countries and from Cyprus1, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, from Bulgaria and Romania and from Croatia) and produces output for the years to The model is composed of five parts:File Size: KB.

For most developing countries, tax revenue lies somewhere between 10% and 15% of gross domestic product. That’s low compared with an average of about 35% for developed countries.

In historical. A simplified microsimulation framework can be formalized as follows. Household per capita income (or its version accounting for economies of scale), y, is normally used as the indicator of household welfare; any economic policy is thus assessed in terms of its impact on this distribution D of income y at time t can be expressed as the product of the joint.

– “Tax-Benefit Models for Developing Countries: Lessons from Developed Countries” (with F Bourguignon) in Tax Policy in Developing Countries (ed. -J Khalilzadeh-Shirazi and A Shah), World Bank, also see new tax-benefit models created for several African countries.

The IAEN visitors spent a week in ISER, working closely with – and learning from – ISER’s Xavier Jara, who is taking the lead on the work to deliver ECUAMOD. During their visit, the visitors attended a three-day training course on the use of EUROMOD and worked with Xavier.

In the SOUTHMOD project microsimulation models for various developing countries are being built and maintained by national teams in the respective countries together with leading researchers in the field, coordinated by UNU-WIDER. As developing countries build up their social protection systems, the financing of public spending will need to increasingly rely on domestic.

spin-off models based on the EUROMOD platform South Africa, Namibia, Serbia, Macedonia, Russia and Australia are the first examples of non-European countries using the EUROMOD platform to develop their own tax-benefit microsimulation models. We do hope others will follow.

The first version of the Serbian microsimulation model SRMOD was released. In Singapore, the Housing Development Board is the government agency charged with providing housing for rent for the needy and with building affordable homes for sale.

This agency has been developing a range of models. These include large apartments – with studio apartments attached – that facilitate mutual care and support by families.

The OECD tax/benefit model has several options which are not reflected in the interactive menu. Additional functionality can be accessed using a control file.

A sample control file has been included with the tax/benefit zip file. The first line is a header line telling the program which variables will be set by the control file.

Comparative Analysis of Basic Income Proposals: prospects for the use of national tax-benefit models in five European countries Tim Callan and Holly Sutherland1 September 1. Introduction The differential impact of comparable Basic Income (BI) schemes is examined for two countries by Callan et al ().

for Tax Policy Makers in Developing Countries,” International Monetary Fund (Washington, D.C.: IMF, ); Alexander Klemm, “Causes, Benefits and Risks of Business Tax.

In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals byGovernments in low- and middle-income countries need to raise sufficient revenues to fund investments in vital public services, infrastructure and social protection policies.

Tax systems also have significant impacts on individuals and businesses, affecting their incomes, incentives and behaviour. Kulp-Wright Book Award, Best Book on Risk and Insurance, American Risk and Insurance Association, Contributions to collective books "Sysiff: A Simulation Program of the French Tax-Benefit System", (with F.

Bourguignon and J. Sastre-Descals), in Tax-Benefit Models, A. Atkinson and H. Sutherland (eds.), Londres,"Tax-Benefit Models for Developing Countries: Lessons from Developed Countries," DELTA Working PapersDELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).

Jenkins, Glenn P. & Kuo, Chun-Yan, " A VAT Revenue Simulation Model for Tax Reform in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pagesApril. The specific objectives of this request for research proposals are to: Understand better the role of tax-benefit policy in developing countries regarding poverty reduction and inequality.

Contribute to a better understanding of modelling behavioural effects within tax-benefit microsimulation models to inform the policy : Anup Kumar Das. Description. Were you looking for the book with access to MyEconLab?

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